As a taxpayer, you are facing what is perhaps an unprecedented set of circumstances – the expiration of the tax rates enacted in 2001, the expiration of more than 150 tax provisions and a tax increase of more than $500 billion overall – that could result in a much higher tax liability when you file your next return.

As we edge nearer to the “fiscal cliff,” as it’s being called, several changes are looming, including (but not limited to) a possible increase on long-term capital gains, restrictions on  itemized deductions, reinstatement of the full payroll tax, and an increase in both the estate tax rate and the number of estates that will be subject to the estate tax. In addition, a new 3.8% surtax on some investment income will become effective Jan. 1, 2013.

Many of these changes will have an impact on small businesses and call for tax planning and possible actions now to soften the potential burden [particularly if you operate as a pass-through entity as many tax increases will affect individuals]. For example, if you are planning to sell appreciated business assets, doing so before the end of 2012 may help avoid the higher capital gains tax. Please come in at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your tax situation and develop a strategy that makes sense for you.

Deductible Business Expenses – How Will You be Affected?

Under Section 179 of the tax code, small businesses can deduct the total cost of some qualifying property in the year it is placed in service, within certain limits, rather than depreciating it over time. The limit on the cost of property (including real property) that can be expensed is now $139,000. The total value of the equipment purchased cannot be higher than $560,000.

As of Jan. 1, 2013, the expensing limit is set to drop and real property, some of which is allowed now, will no longer be included. As a result, businesses may want to consider making equipment or property purchases before year-end to take advantage of the higher expense amount. What may be critical to taking advantage of section 179 election is whether the equipment can be put into service before Jan. 1, 2013.

Also, with the expiration of current 50% first-year bonus depreciation allowance, businesses will have to revert to the modified accelerated cost recovery system to calculate depreciation, meaning that more costs will have to be deducted over time rather than immediately.

Pass-Through Entities

As a pass-through entity, there are several other issues to consider since you pay your business taxes as an individual, including:

  • The return of the phase-out for itemized deductions for a taxpayer who has adjusted gross income over roughly $175,000 as well as a phase-out of personal exemptions for taxpayers with income over a certain level. Each one would limit the amount of allowable deductions and raise the taxpayer’s net taxable income.
  • The lowest individual income tax rate will rise from 10% to 15% and all other individual rates will also edge up.
  • Due to an expiring Bush-era tax cut, a broader marriage penalty will mean higher tax bills for married couples. Instead of the current 200%, the standard deduction for married couples filing jointly will fall to 167% of the standard deduction for single taxpayers.
  • The alternative minimum tax (AMT) will apply to 2012 income for many more Americans if not indexed for inflation. At the end of 2011, the AMT exemption was $74,450 for married taxpayers and $48,450 for singles. It is set to fall to $45,000 for joint filers and $33,750 for single filers. Taxpayers are also set to lose the ability to offset their AMT bite with personal tax credits.
  • The credit for Research and Experimentation Expenses, worth up to 20% of qualified costs, expired at the end of 2011 and has not been extended.

We also want to remind you that business owners and self-employed individuals need to:

  • Obtain tax identification numbers for all the individuals to whom they send Forms 1099-Misc
  • Closely review their estimated tax calculations in light of any tax changes that occur

Azran Financial can help you review those calculations to understand the effect these possible increases could have on your tax situation. Please contact us today at (310) 691-5040 or (818) 691-1234, or e-mail us at info@www.azranfinancial.com to schedule an appointment to develop strategies to minimize the impact of this uncertain tax climate on your business.

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